a          robin           among           crabapple           buds

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Larger, more colorful, and stronger hoppers than earlier,
late-stage Spotted Lanternfly nymphs are nearing adult flight.

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Spotted Lanternfly nymphs, hatched from an overwintered egg mass,
gather upon a black walnut tree branch.

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Native to Asia and reported in growing numbers across southeastern Pennsylvania since 2014, these nymphs are the first I’ve seen on our small patch of Little Crum Creek — first individually in the milkweed garden and grass, and now most frequently together (in the absence of their preferred tree-of-heaven) in this black walnut.

Normally, I’d wait to collect and post images of each life-cycle stage.  But you might be seeing these early nymphs too. If so, posting sooner seems better than later.

The Penn State Extension provides all we might like to know about identification and management of these invasive newcomers.

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less familiar than enduring

the impression left by a Great Egret

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a fisher                                            fathoms                                       the creek’s promise

 

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lucky glance             where others pass            a palm warbler            under lifted fence

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casting out from a perch to catch a fly and return — an Eastern Phoebe.

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a leaf-footed bug                          each leg let fall                          portending leaves to come

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hours

on the hydrangea –

a common buckeye butterfly (Junonia coenia).

 

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     busily                                             bumblebee                                            blue lobelia

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