Not here, anyway.

Not within the 30 square yards or so where most of this blog happens. 

Not in the rest of Ridley Township or Swarthmore Borough where Little Crum Creek flows.

And not, as far as I can tell, along Crum Creek from Swarthmore down to the Delaware River.

So far.

So, I traveled about an hour north up the PA Turnpike (I-476) to Green Lane Park in Montgomery County to meet a friend and track down Brood X before it’s “gone”.

Brood X is the generation of Periodical Cicadas (Magicicada) emerging en masse this spring. 

Feeding underground for the past 17 years, cicada nymphs are now surfacing to molt a final time (leaving old skin behind like shells), take wing, sing, mate, and produce a new generation of eggs.

Once hatched, new nymphs will find their way underground to resume the 17-year cycle.

How about you … happened to see a cicada lately?  I’d love to hear where!

Here’s some of what we found at Green Lane Park:

 

Ground holes where Periodical Cicada nymphs surfaced after 17 years.

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Cool Resources

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Hairy Woodpecker                             helps          chip          a          felled          tree.

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expected surprise:                    splash                    and a kingfisher’s cry

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In April’s final days, a crowd of fish brushed clean some gravel.

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The most colorful, looking 4-7 inches long,

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dimpled shallow water 

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vying for spots to spawn.

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Recognize any of these fish?

I’d be happy for help identifying them!

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reflects on little crum creek

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hawthorn petals                    quicken                     maple shade

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a          robin           among           crabapple           buds

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Larger, more colorful, and stronger hoppers than earlier,
late-stage Spotted Lanternfly nymphs are nearing adult flight.

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Spotted Lanternfly nymphs, hatched from an overwintered egg mass,
gather upon a black walnut tree branch.

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Native to Asia and reported in growing numbers across southeastern Pennsylvania since 2014, these nymphs are the first I’ve seen on our small patch of Little Crum Creek — first individually in the milkweed garden and grass, and now most frequently together (in the absence of their preferred tree-of-heaven) in this black walnut.

Normally, I’d wait to collect and post images of each life-cycle stage.  But you might be seeing these early nymphs too. If so, posting sooner seems better than later.

The Penn State Extension provides all we might like to know about identification and management of these invasive newcomers.

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less familiar than enduring

the impression left by a Great Egret

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