How often, so easily, might we overlook you, leaf-like little planthopper.

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Northern flatid planthoppers are common here on the stems of plants they might eat.

But I could not resist the dramatic image of one on the ground it will someday feed.

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ID Reference (U of DE)

Called the sulphur pearl in its native Europe and a carrot seed moth in North America,

Sitochroa palealis was first reported in the U.S. in 2002.

But we just met, the two of us, hanging in the grass of national moth week.

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Ceaselessly it seems waves of cicadas sound swells

and breaks upon the heat of day.

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Pictured: Neotibicen tibicen tibicen
(aka morning cicada, swamp cicada)

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Lines of living geometry provide sufficient pause to discover, instead of a butterfly,

two of a kind of hoop-skirted moth: Chalcoela iphitalis, the sooty-winged chalcoela,

whose caterpillars hatch in paper wasp nests, feed on the host wasp’s larvae,
occupy then vacant cells for their own metamorphosis, and emerge to resume the circle all over.

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  mown a moment remembering thyme-leaved speedwell (Veronica serpyllifolia).

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