Insects


Larger, more colorful, and stronger hoppers than earlier,
late-stage Spotted Lanternfly nymphs are nearing adult flight.

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Spotted Lanternfly nymphs, hatched from an overwintered egg mass,
gather upon a black walnut tree branch.

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Native to Asia and reported in growing numbers across southeastern Pennsylvania since 2014, these nymphs are the first I’ve seen on our small patch of Little Crum Creek — first individually in the milkweed garden and grass, and now most frequently together (in the absence of their preferred tree-of-heaven) in this black walnut.

Normally, I’d wait to collect and post images of each life-cycle stage.  But you might be seeing these early nymphs too. If so, posting sooner seems better than later.

The Penn State Extension provides all we might like to know about identification and management of these invasive newcomers.

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a leaf-footed bug                          each leg let fall                          portending leaves to come

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on the hydrangea –

a common buckeye butterfly (Junonia coenia).

 

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     busily                                             bumblebee                                            blue lobelia

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Paper wasps scour milkweed leaf tops, hungry for aphid “honeydew” frass
(noted in this 2017 post) dropped from leaf bottoms above.

Clockwise from top left:
Guinea wasp (Polistes exclamans),  Northern paper wasp (Polistes fuscatus), Metricus paper wasp (Polistes metricus), European paper wasp (Polistes dominula).

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Fall webworms make a nursery of the mulberry tree, devouring leaves under silken cover.
How many will survive fall and winter, pupating on the ground below,
to emerge as moths (Hyphantria cunea) in spring?

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The rhythm of their lights still freshly impressing the mind, I thought
I’d discovered a late season firefly. But its sudden spring from sight left
a more telling impression: Disonycha glabrata, the pigweed flea beetle.

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A cuckoo wasp (Chrysis angolensis species, I believe) takes a shine to the milkweed leaves.

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Surviving, colored design fading, a toothed brown carpet moth
(Xanthorhoe lacustrata) shows the beauty of its aging.

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